How to Avoid Coronavirus Phishing Scams | #phishing | #scams | #education | #technology | #infosec



Here are some additional tips from digital security experts.

Think before you click. Howes says the best thing consumers can do to protect themselves is just slow down. If something doesn’t seem right about an email, just delete it—ideally before you open it. You’re better off not taking the risk.

Examine the link. Before you click on a link, try hovering your mouse over it. This will reveal the full address, which can expose signs of fraud. A “.ru” on the end, for example, means the site was created in Russia; “.br” means Brazil.

Misspellings in URLs are another good tip-off to a fake website. If the URL says corronaviruss.com, it’s best to avoid it. And if you get an email advertising a great deal on masks or hand sanitizer at a major retailer, open a window in your browser, search for the retailer’s web address, and compare it with the one in your email.

Don’t assume that a website is legitimate just because its URL starts with “https.” Criminals like to use encryption, too.

Don’t open attachments. They may contain malware. And you should never type confidential information into a form attached to an email. The sender can potentially track the info you enter.

Guard your financial information. Be wary of emails asking for account numbers, credit card numbers, wire transfers, and failed transactions. There’s no reason to share such info via message or an unsecure site.

Turn on auto updates. This goes for your computer, smartphone, and tablets. Up-to-date antivirus software goes a long way toward stopping malware.

Use security tools. Install an antivirus program on your device, and keep it up to date. You can also use a website reputation rating tool, which comes in the form of a browser plugin, to warn you if you try to go to potentially dangerous websites. Cybersecurity companies such as McAfee, Kaspersky, and NortonLifeLock offer them. But keep in mind that these tools aren’t foolproof.



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